Addressing The Misconceptions About Home Inspections

Addressing The Misconceptions About Home Inspections

Professional Services

There are many myths and misconceptions about home inspections and these can lead to homeowners and potential homeowners taking unnecessary risks and avoid having an inspection carried out. Once you get past these misconceptions you can start to fully understand why they are necessary for potential buyers and sellers. These inspections should only be conducted by a professional and fully qualified inspector as the information contained in the report may influence your buying decision. Below are some of the common misconceptions that are regularly face my home inspectors. 1. The belief that if an appraisal has been conducted, then an inspection is not required The purpose of an appraisal is to get a valuation of the property. On some occasions defects may be detected but this is not the primary purpose of an appraisal. A home inspection on the other hand involves a detailed inspection of the house WITH the primary purpose to detect faults and problems. Every aspect of the home will be checked both internally and externally, from floor to roof. Essentially, the home inspector will check for structural, mechanical and technical faults and report on their findings. 2. ALL faults must be fixed before a sale can be finalised Another misconception is that the seller MUST rectify ALL faults before a sale can be completed. The only repairs that must be carried out are ones that are in breach of the mandatory municipal code. Often, many faults are rectified by the buyer but the fact that the fault has been identified can be used as a negotiation tool when it comes to the price. 3. There is no need for professional home inspector A common but very dangerous myth is that anyone with experience in real estate or the construction industry can conduct an inspection. Often potential buyers will ask a friend or relative to ‘look over the property’ with them. As this person is unlikely to have any professional qualifications any findings can only be ‘an opinion’ rather than anything factual. This means that the buyer is in a very weak position when it comes to bargaining and renegotiating a price. 4. Not required for new build properties New properties definitely need to be checked by a qualified building inspector. Snag reports are there for a reason and indeed faults are common on new properties. New properties often have a one year warranty so you can get the property inspected after you have moved in. Always edge on the side of caution. Many buyers and realtors are not allowed to inspect properties as they are being built and disreputable builders may cut corners. It is better to be safe than sorry. Conclusion The purpose of a home inspection is to provide the potential buyer or seller with as much information as possible about the current state of a property. From the information provided, the buyer or seller is in a position to make an informed decision. It is certainly not a case of pass or fail.